Typical summertime weather Labor Day weekend; Tracking Dorian

Today's Forecast
Pascagoula, MS

Pascagoula, MS

Pascagoula, MS

Leakesville, MS

Leakesville, MS

Lucedale, MS

Lucedale, MS

Fort Walton Beach, FL

Fort Walton Beach, FL

Milton, FL

Milton, FL

Crestview, FL

Crestview, FL

Fairhope, AL

Fairhope, AL

Bay Minette, AL

Bay Minette, AL

Atmore, AL

Atmore, AL

Brewton, AL

Brewton, AL

Evergreen, AL

Evergreen, AL

Monroeville, AL

Monroeville, AL

Chatom, AL

Chatom, AL

Grove Hill, AL

Grove Hill, AL

Dauphin Island, AL

Dauphin Island, AL

MOBILE, Ala. (WKRG) –

We made it to the end of the week everyone, happy Labor Day Weekend. Tonight will be a perfect late August night. IT will be warm early on, but temperatures will fall steadily and by daybreak we’ll be in the upper 60s and low 70s under clear skies. Our break from high humidity comes to an end tomorrow as we’re back to normal, but it will still be a nice weekend. Highs will be in the lower to middle 90s through Monday, but we’ll get our typical daytime pop ups. It’s a 30% chance tomorrow and Monday, but Sunday that chance goes to 50%.

Dorian continues to strengthen and is now a major hurricane. Its path over recent hours has become more west-northwest compared to northwest the last two days.

Dorian will continue on this trajectory as it moves towards the Bahamas and Florida’s East Coast. The official forecast for Dorian still calls for it to strengthen into a category 4 storm. The forecast is becoming more clear as we work towards Labor Day as it will steadily work west-northwest or due west while also slowing down. However, past Monday into Tuesday, there is a lot of uncertainty with the forecast. This is due to how the steering winds are going to set up. The trends from the models today have shown as Dorian approaches the Florida east coast it will take a turn to the north, but it’s unclear when this will happen at this time. It may begin turning north before reaching the East Coast of Florida, as it moves onto the Florida Peninsula, or it may move into the far eastern Gulf and then turn north.

Anyone along the Florida Peninsula at the very least needs to be thinking about preparations for Dorian, while those along the East Coast need to be ready in case Dorian heads for their neighborhood. Due to how intense Dorian could be along with the forecast slow movement, this has the potential to be a devastating storm from storm surge and the potential for flooding rains. At this point, it’s impossible to say what the eventual impacts will be and where and when, but again, for those in the path of this storm, they need to be ready.

With the long-range uncertainty, areas in southeast Georgia and coastal Carolina also need to pay close attention to the forecast and be thinking about their hurricane preparations plan.

For us, along our stretch of the Gulf Coast, Dorian does not currently pose a threat. Forecast trends today have been positive in the sense that it looks less likely it would move into the Gulf, but there’s still a small chance that it could happen. We need to continue following closely, but again, it’s not a threat. If a threat were to develop with Dorian, we’d let you know as soon as one develops.

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