Mobile, Ala. (WKRG) – After a two year break due to COVID, the Poarch Band of Creek Indians will once again celebrate one of its most unique and enduring Thanksgiving tradition with its annual Pow Wow. This year’s the 50th anniversary of the annual Porch Creek Indians Pow Wow. About 16,000 people make the trek to Atmore, Alabama, over Thanksgiving and the day after.

And joining us now on the Red Couch, Gregory McGhee from the Porch Creek Indians joins us here, along with Sehoye Buckley, who was in the regalia of dancers for the Porch Creek Nation.

Read the full interview below or watch it in the video above.

Shamonee Baker: After a two year break due to COVID, the Poarch Band of Creek Indians will once again celebrate one of its most unique and enduring Thanksgiving tradition with its annual Pow Wow. This year’s the 50th anniversary of the annual Porch Creek Indians Pow Wow. About 16,000 people make the trek to Atmore, Alabama, over Thanksgiving and the day after.

Bill Riales: And joining us now on the Red Couch, Gregory McGhee from the Porch Creek Indians joins us here, along with Sehoye Buckley, who was in the regalia of dancers for the Porch Creek Nation. I tell you why this is such an interesting event because it’s unlike anything that I think people see on a regular basis.

Gregory McGhee, Poarch Band of Creek Indians: Yes, sir. First of all, good morning. Thank you for having us on Porch Band of Creek Indians. We’re very excited to be here and we’re very excited for our 50th annual celebration here. It started as a homecoming for our people in throughout the previous 49 years it’s gotten so big that it’s actually a pretty big deal throughout the Southeast. One of our our this is the biggest event that we hold as a tribe. In the throughout the year. And so we’re just excited to be here. Our pow wow brings natives from all across the country to this area. And so like I said, we’re just so excited to be here after a two year break due to COVID, you know, with all that craziness and stuff, this is going to be our 50th annual. So it’s it’s really a big deal for for our people. And so we want to invite everyone out there to come and visit, come learn a little bit about native culture and the things that you’ll see. There’s vendors, it’s going to be there. You you can pick up one of a kind of souvenirs and things like that.

Shamonee: So and talk about the different tribes. I mean, like you said, they’re coming from all over to talk about that a little bit.

Gregory McGhee: So the tribes that it’ll be coming from, from they really come from all all across the United States, upwards of Washington, all into Canada, way up into New York, that it really doesn’t matter. Because the thing about our pow wow is it’s actually one of the bigger pow wows across the country, and especially here in the Southeast our pow wow is known to be wide, uh, have a wide range of people coming in, whether it’s singers or dancers, or just some of the vendors that will have the vendors are very unique. A lot of the vendors that will have will be of course, they’re from different places as well. But they’re one of a kind and they’re certified Native American artisans. So a lot of these are you know, for myself, we always have this that one person that we’re struggling to get a gift for. So I guarantee you, if you come on out, you’ll find that you’ll find that one gift that you’re struggling to find.

Bill: I tell you what, it is happening November 24th and 25th at 6477 Jack Springs Road in that Atmore gates open at 10 a.m. get there early and have a good time. Gregory McGhee yes Sehoye Buckley with the regalia of the Indian dancers look forward to them Thanksgiving. We’ve got more to come in just a moment.