Mobile, Ala. (WKRG) – Gun violence in many cities across the Gulf Coast and the nation, for that matter, has become all too common. There is a movement now for men to stand up and stand against violence. Joining us this morning on the Red Couch, we have John Young calling on all men of Mobile in leadership to stand up against violence.

Read the full interview below or watch it in the video above.

Bill: Well, you know, gun violence in many cities across the Gulf Coast and the nation, for that matter, has become all too common.

Jessica: Well, there is a movement now for men to stand up and stand against violence. Joining us this morning on the Red Couch, we have John Young calling on all men of Mobile in leadership to stand up against violence.
Tell us how you’re doing that this morning.

John Young, Men Against Violence: Well, Good Morning. Thanks for having me. We’re just saying, man, unite against violence. We believe that if we reinculcate family, men leading their homes again, we can solve a lot of these problems, raising young men and teaching them how to deal with their emotions and their problems. And the history is on our side.
This wasn’t an issue until the 1970s when homes began breaking down. Before that, fathers and mothers raise their children, which is the best social program we have out there. So this Saturday we’re inviting men. We don’t care who you vote for who you worship. Come down and meet us at Bienville Square. We’re going to rally and stand shoulder to shoulder and take back our homes, our families and our communities.

Bill: You mentioned families breaking down and of course, that’s a fundamental problem with the whole issue. But how do you defeat that? Is there a mentorship? Can other men step in where Father figures are not in a family?

John Young: The way we defeat that is reciprocity. Growing up, we heard in our homes what we were supposed to do, but on the school bus and school, on the way home, we heard it at the grocery store from the auto mechanic.
The mentorship is men realizing their duty, their roles, their responsibilities, and fulfilling them. In the home, at work when you’re in the grocery store or the supermarket market line, someone’s watching you be that example. And when you’re able to repeat that message, it still comes down to self-determination for these young men. But we should give them an alternative to the materialism we’re competing with.
And that is by being a man, be a man from the 1970s, be that man.

Jessica: And we look at the seems like a cycle so often. How do you reach the very youngest, the boys at this point and teach them to grow into being men?

John Young: Well, we reached them where they are and we tell them the truth. As harsh as it might be, they have a choice.
They can choose to work hard, graduate high school and not have children until they’re married and can afford them or they can pursue materialism. And we just have to keep repeating that message. There’s not a person I know that would not take home 100 kids and raise them if they could. That’s impossible. But what we as men can do is set an example, be a positive role model, grow up, pull our pants up, cut our hair, and be man again.
Real live man again, not what we have now on television.

Bill: Your event coming up.

John Young: It’s this Saturday, November 19th. Alabama’s playing Austin Peay. You’re not going to miss anything. So come on out. We’re going to muster. We’re going to muster at Dauphin Street, at Jefferson, and we’re going to walk down to be Bienville Square. We have some local guest speakers, just normal, everyday guys who are going to encourage us once again, what our rightful place at the head of homes.

Bill: Truer words have never been spoken on both counts. Right.

Jessica: We appreciate you being here, John Young, and we appreciate what you’re doing in the community.