WRBL has updated the story to reflect a Lee County Judge will hold a hearing to discuss the state’s motion to revoke bond.

AUBURN, Ala. (WRBL) – The Auburn man charged in the deadly 2019 vehicle crash that killed the voice of the Auburn Tigers and wife is back in jail. WRBL can confirm 19-year-old Johnston Taylor’s bond on allegations of Possession of Child Pornography was revoked for testing positive for marijuana. 

Taylor was booked into the Lee County Justice Center on Tuesday, December 13th after a Lee County Judge approved a request from the District Attorney to revoke Taylor’s bond. According to court documents on or about December 13, 2022, Taylor failed a drug test by testing positive for marijuana, a violation of his bond conditions. The judge ordered Taylor to be held in the Lee County Jail pending the final disposition of all matters.

In June of 2022, the teen was arrested by Auburn police on allegations of six Felony charges for Possession of Child Pornography.  Auburn Police and the Alabama Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force initiated a June investigation after Johnston allegedly downloaded multiple child porn videos to a dropbox account. Taylor’s attorney Walter Northcutt spoke with WRBL shortly after his client was arrested.

“I’m just hoping everyone doesn’t jump to conclusions. We hope the public will give us time, give me time, to look at the evidence and figure out what happened and give the young man an equal opportunity that everyone deserves under the law,” said Northcutt.

Taylor was 16 when he crashed into Rod and Paula Bramblett on March 25, 2019, along Shug Jordan Parkway, killing the couple.

Taylor is traveling 91 miles per hour.  Taylor’s blood sample indicated “recent” use of marijuana.

The District Attorney wanted to try Taylor as an adult. However, a judge granted Youthful Offender status in April of 2021. The ruling was a legal win for Taylor’s defense and prevented the public from knowing the exact punishment and the circumstances of his probation. We do know YO reduces a possible prison sentence and probation to three years. Since the case was considered an adjudication, not a conviction, Taylor was able to own a firearm, vote, hold public office, and did not have to disclose the crime on a job application. 

Now, Taylor is expected to be charged as an adult in the child pornography case. With this recent bond revocation, Taylor will remain in jail until trial or the case is resolved in a court of law.